Study Groups

Working with Object Loss

Loss of an object can wreak havoc on internal structure. Working with patients who have lost someone or something significant can quickly feel full of despair, hopeless, and unending. Some patients cannot seem to stop mourning, while others refuse to mourn at all. In this study group, we will read and discuss five essential papers on object loss, published in Rita V.

Psychoanalysis and Daseinsanalysis

How might these foundations be challenged from an existential perspective, and how might such a challenge expand our understanding of our patients? This reading group will explore the theory of daseinsanalysis, an existential-phenomenological reformulation of psychoanalytic theory put forth by Medard Boss (patient of Freud and friend of the philosopher Martin Heidegger), and its potential to expand our ability to adapt to our most distressed and fragile patients. Participants will read through Boss's Psychoanalysis and Daseinsanalysis over the course of four meetings.

Herman Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener: Stretching our capacity to think clinically and creatively about Bartleby’s complex psychic structures (Group 3)

The setting for this novella is mid-19th Century Wall Street in New York City.  When Bartleby’s employer, a lawyer, asks him to do some work, Bartleby famously answers: “I would prefer not to.”  Why does Bartleby obsessively refuse work orders and why does his employer obsessively try to reason with him rather than dismiss him?  We will examine the obsessive conflict between Bartleby and the lawyer.

Herman Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener: Stretching our capacity to think clinically and creatively about Bartleby’s complex psychic structures (Group 2)

The setting for this novella is mid-19th Century Wall Street in New York City.  When Bartleby’s employer, a lawyer, asks him to do some work, Bartleby famously answers: “I would prefer not to.”  Why does Bartleby obsessively refuse work orders and why does his employer obsessively try to reason with him rather than dismiss him?  We will examine the obsessive conflict between Bartleby and the lawyer.

Herman Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener: Stretching our capacity to think clinically and creatively about Bartleby’s complex psychic structures (Group 1)

The setting for this novella is mid-19th Century Wall Street in New York City.  When Bartleby’s employer, a lawyer, asks him to do some work, Bartleby famously answers: “I would prefer not to.”  Why does Bartleby obsessively refuse work orders and why does his employer obsessively try to reason with him rather than dismiss him?  We will examine the obsessive conflict between Bartleby and the lawyer.

How Attachment Patterns shape the Therapeutic Relationship (Group 4)

At its core, psychotherapy is a relational process, and our early attachment relationships do much to shape the way that we show up in psychotherapy, both as clients and therapists. Consider how attachment theory and research can inform how you see the ways that you and your client relate to one another and the world. In this group, we will be reading from David Wallin’s book Attachment in Psychotherapy and exploring together how attachment patterns show up in our work.

How Attachment Patterns shape the Therapeutic Relationship (Group 3)

At its core, psychotherapy is a relational process, and our early attachment relationships do much to shape the way that we show up in psychotherapy, both as clients and therapists. Consider how attachment theory and research can inform how you see the ways that you and your client relate to one another and the world. In this group, we will be reading from David Wallin’s book Attachment in Psychotherapy and exploring together how attachment patterns show up in our work.

How Attachment Patterns shape the Therapeutic Relationship (Group 2)

At its core, psychotherapy is a relational process, and our early attachment relationships do much to shape the way that we show up in psychotherapy, both as clients and therapists. Consider how attachment theory and research can inform how you see the ways that you and your client relate to one another and the world. In this group, we will be reading from David Wallin’s book Attachment in Psychotherapy and exploring together how attachment patterns show up in our work.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Study Groups